Addiction Recovery Blog

Strengthen Families & Communities this National Recovery Month

[fa icon="calendar"] Sep 18, 2017 11:27:28 AM / by Bobby Coffey

Bobby Coffey

Substance use disorder can be incredibly hard on those afflicted as well as their families, friends, coworkers and the impact can ebb out to the entire community. It is important that anyone who is struggling with substance use or mental health disorders get the help they need. To help families get the right tools to start conversations about prevention, treatment, and recovery, we support National Recovery Month.

National Recovery Month September 2017

National Recovery Month is sponsored by Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and is designed to create awareness about substance use disorders and promote long lasting recovery. It highlights not only those who have recovered from substance use, but those who have helped make it possible and promotes that the recovery journey can be a positive and enriching experience.

This year’s National Recovery Month theme is “Join the Voices for Recovery: Strengthen Families and Communities and focuses on the ways that families can support their loved ones with the right treatment programs and an influential support system. Events during this year’s recovery month are aimed at sharing recovery stories to give others encouragement, insight, and support during recovery.

How do you help your loved ones with addiction?

National Recovery Month is a positive way to acknowledge the importance of recovery and to celebrate all of those who work together to make it possible. It can also serve as inspiration for someone struggling with substance use disorder to take the first step towards recovery.

Topics: Addiction, Sober Living

Bobby Coffey

Written by Bobby Coffey

Bobby’s personal recovery journey began almost 25 years ago and he has been involved in advocacy for people in or seeking recovery from addiction for almost 15 years. He is a founding member of the DC Recovery Community Alliance and a former board member of Faces & Voices of Recovery.

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